SALVAGE GIVES CONVICTION TO A MODERNIST ADDITION

When designing an addition to a 1949 bauhaus classic by noted Modernist Samuel Glaser, great care was taken to make the look and feel of the new work entirely consistent with the original. This meant that we were to reproduce existing millwork and trim details throughout the addition.

 

SALVAGE GIVES CONVICTION TO A MODERNIST ADDITION

But nothing is so seamless and consistent with original work as original work. Where existing details had to be removed, we made every effort to salvage them intact and to carefully plan their reuse in order to give them a strategic prominence. The design called for the removal of six doors, and associated jambs, casings and trim, all of which were repurposed into the new layout.

Modernism defines space with an understated minimalism. But rather than obscuring the rather simple trim and panel details, this austerity sets them off, focusing attention on their character and quality, in a way a more complex design scheme would not. We faithfully reproduced all millwork on site, as necessary, from clear red birch, with birch veneer plywood for the panels.

False modesty aside, our reproduction work was precise and effective. That said, nothing can equal the authority of original work, the depth of finish, the patina, the pure conviction. For us, the ultimate compliment was that one couldn’t tell where the old work ended and the new work began. It was as if we had never been there.